Frieze New York 2022

Calm in the Deep Below, 2020

Painted perforated Steel, aluminium, painted bronze
220 x 165.5 x 15 cm 86 5/8 x 65 1/8 x 5 7/8 in

Boyce’s practice is deeply rooted in examining the intersections of art, design and nature, known for collapsing distinctions between the past and present, as if detached from any fixed place or time. The panel consists of a painted perforated steel ‘canvas’ onto which bronze casts of a fluorescent light transformer, wire and end caps that would attach to either end of a fluorescent light bulb, have been attached. The long connecting wires swirl and loop creating a graceful drawing. In 1998 Boyce created a large room filled installation titled ‘When Now is Night’ in which a huge spider’s web was constructed from different lengths of off the shelf fluorescent strip lights. At the time Boyce described the process as “drawing with lines of light”. The ‘drawing’ in bronze wire also references a multitude of influences for Boyce, from Picasso’s drawings to Christopher Wool to Warhols ‘yarn’ paintings. The panel Calm in the Deep Below also references Boyce’s Dead Stars series in which lamps with cast bronze lamp holders were shown. The impossibility of illumination through the bronze elements lent these pieces a melancholic poetry, aligning the wonders of the solar system with the quotidian presence of the domestic lamps.

Calm in the Deep Below, 2020

Painted perforated Steel, aluminium, painted bronze
220 x 165.5 x 15 cm 86 5/8 x 65 1/8 x 5 7/8 in

Lucky Free Coin, 2021

Acrylic on canvas, panel, rope and mixed media
127 x 134.6 cm 50 x 53 in

Rachel Williams’s practice pushes the formal boundaries of painting and radical material exploration, embodying a sculptural form beyond its canvas dimensions. Always beginning each work with rolls of untreated canvas and cotton, Williams is constantly evolving her language of material and colour. Williams paints with materials: birthed from layers of fragmented canvas, paper folder dividers and staples; ropes of varying size, textures and purposes; and even deconstructed components of a hammock, all either painted over or left surrounded by the swathe of saturated colours evocative of influential Black abstractionists such as Alma Thomas and Al Loving. Pieces are moved and reused, each layer revealing an entirely different and unexpected image beneath as shapes and colours clash, complement, circle, and conjoin with a similar intensity excelled by Howardena Pindell. This complex balancing of light and heavy, and incorporation of offcuts of past works leads memory and history to form organically. The assemblages continuously encourage the viewer to search for more information as ropes trace elusive shapes akin to Joan Miró and edge the paintings, its ornamental frame allowing the works to spill beyond its formal confines, leading the paintings and artist to occupy space both literally and metaphorically.

Lucky Free Coin, 2021

Acrylic on canvas, panel, rope and mixed media
127 x 134.6 cm 50 x 53 in

Pipe, 2018

Painted steel and transparent acrylic lacquer
164 x 130 x 60cm, 64.6 x 51.2 x 23.6in

Monika Sosnowska’s practice is inspired by cities that are constantly changing and structurally in flux. Ruins of post-industrial buildings, the continuous evolution of landscape and environment, along with key figures in European modernism have long informed the artist’s approach to the making and development of her ideas. Sosnowska not only observes and translates her visual findings into grand, complex and impactful sculptures but also documents and reflects on the site’s natural setting, surrounding urban form and its embedded history; in turn prompting a much wider social engagement that considers our own perceptions of physical and private space, personal interactions, and associated memory. Often replicating real-sized architectural forms — Sosnowska distorts and fatigues her industrial material, creating disorientating, constructions whose curtailed and compressed shapes bend as if weathered by the demands of historical time. The structural impossibility of her work highlights a point of departure, as the functionality and rationality of architecture gives way to the uncertainty and — perhaps even — absurdity of sculpture. This pieces is a development from the artist’s recent ‘Pipe’ series. The series shifts the topology of an arresting section of steel pipe that is sliced and twisted, reminiscent of a Möbius strip.

Pipe, 2018

Painted steel and transparent acrylic lacquer
164 x 130 x 60cm, 64.6 x 51.2 x 23.6in

Clouds, 2022

Acrylic on denim
46 x 35 cm, 18 1/8 x 13 3/4 in

Drawing inspiration from his seaside hometown in Merseyside, Michael Wilkinson’s most recent paintings depict pink sunsets. Inspired by Chinese and Japanese stylised clouds, Wilkinson layers these to create a clear distinction on the horizon, and the vast emptiness of the bare linen. Enthused by pop culture, art history, radicalism and anarchism, Wilkison explores the structures of power and hierarchy that govern political and social expression. Through the source material he collects, dissects, and reproduces, Wilkinson chronicles moments of protest and upheaval. Wilkinson’s meticulous, meditative approach to making undermines and “unbuilds” historical narratives that conform to prescribed, linear narratives.

Clouds, 2022

Acrylic on denim
46 x 35 cm, 18 1/8 x 13 3/4 in

Persil, 2022

Bronze
Torso 101.6 x 61 x 50.8 cm, 40 x 24 x 20 in; Leg 100.3 x 71.1 x 25.4 cm, 39 1/2 x 28 x 10 in, Edition of 3

Jesse Wine’s sculptures investigate mediums, form and colour, testing the capability of raw materials through risk taking. He explores different avenues regarding conventional ceramic, clay and bronze structures and coating, studying strategies and accepting the chance of mistake and vulnerability. At Frieze New York the gallery will exhibit a new bronze sculpture. Wine describes the piece “The reclining figure is a cogent starting point for sculpture, it"is central to my art practice because it is a stalwart of art and art making. The cross-cultural/ time study of the human form is present in the art of every human civilisation – the form is, in and of itself part of a bigger, extended dialogue in which the work is participating.” Persil is suitable for outdoor display.

Persil, 2022

Bronze
Torso 101.6 x 61 x 50.8 cm, 40 x 24 x 20 in; Leg 100.3 x 71.1 x 25.4 cm, 39 1/2 x 28 x 10 in, Edition of 3

moonlit blue, 2022

Acrylic and sennelier oil pastel on canvas
261.6 x 256.5 cm, 103 x 101 in unframed 264.5 x 259.4 x 7.6 cm, 104 1/8 x 102 1/8 x 3 in framed

Ever resistant to categorisation, Sweeney draws inspiration from his lived experience and persona as a vital presence in the New York cultural scene. Sweeney’s idiosyncratic talent enables him to traverse the multiplicity of styles and modes working within visual art, music and performance. Indeed, in Sweeney’s practice we witness a desire to celebrate art’s function in life and the world’s potential as a receptive, unrestrictive creative space. For Frieze Sweeney will present a new large scale painting. Sweeney’s imagery is centered on the human figure, ranging from semiabstract reclining nudes to surreal, ambiguously gendered self-portraits. Conveying intense emotion through lively color and deft handling of paint, his art maps the physical and psychological spaces occupied by the body. Included in our preview is a work from Sweeney’s ‘Party Paintings’ series. In these works Sweeney produced paintings of posters for events which happened at his now closed New York club Santos Party House. The piece EPDM Party Paitning is included in Sweeney’s current show at The Brant Foundation, which runs until September 2022.

moonlit blue, 2022

Acrylic and sennelier oil pastel on canvas
261.6 x 256.5 cm, 103 x 101 in unframed 264.5 x 259.4 x 7.6 cm, 104 1/8 x 102 1/8 x 3 in framed

Through Us Through You, 2022

Acrylic on wood panel
121.9 x 243.8 cm, 48 x 96 in

For Frieze New York we will present a new dytpich painting by Julia Chiang. Julia Chiang’s practice experiments with the interplay of a repeated pattern, which reflects her environment through colour and tenderness. Chiang’s detailed paintings take flat-coloured grounds as a setting for an intricate web of shapes and forms, flowing in converging directions and carefully constructed through layers of paint. Chiang’s works express the importance of the material, the wooden panel structure, and the translucent paint, and convey an aliveness and stillness through the repetition of the eclipse emblem, varying in size and transparency and responding to the spirituality of nature.

Through Us Through You, 2022

Acrylic on wood panel
121.9 x 243.8 cm, 48 x 96 in

Celestial Crown, 2022

Sunglass lens, lead came
80.5 x 133.5 x 4.5 cm, 31 3/4 x 52 1/2 x 1 3/4 in

Glasgow-based Jim Lambie’s practice is often exemplified by his response to the psychology of space and colour, utilising the two in a way that is deeply rooted in colour theory, and draws parallels with the concept of synaesthesia. A new metal box piece by Lambie is included in our preview, from the renowned series that the artist has been producing for over 10 years. The works are designed to look like peeling concert posters and fly-posted from performance venues, and they allude to the vital role music has played in Lambie’s profession. We will also present a new work from his recent sunglass series – created from salvaged sunglass lenses soldered together with lead frames, the pieces are a nod to pop culture and music (as is so much of Lambie’s work), as well as the artisanal technique used to make stained glass in the Middle Ages. Set in the metal with the identical technique of lead gothic windows they constitute new constellations that can be focused even with the naked eye. Viewers and their surroundings are reflected in each lens, transforming the space and our perception into a vibrant, undulating landscape of colour, rhythm, movement, and groove. This new sunglasses piece only contains black lens, a darker approach to the series, reflecting the viewer more clearly than before.

Celestial Crown, 2022

Sunglass lens, lead came
80.5 x 133.5 x 4.5 cm, 31 3/4 x 52 1/2 x 1 3/4 in

Zone Plans, 2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas
220 x 240 x 3.5 cm, 86 5/8 x 94 1/2 x 1 3/8 in

Presenting new works for Frieze New York, Morton creates a assembled experience of space, movement and depth via her colour relationships and choreography of linearity and masking. Shaped and constructed over time, each canvas explores the organic nature of paint and the ongoing behaviour of painting with multiple layers of varying luminosity and swelling of colours covering the surface. Morton’s paintings, reflect her connection and exploration of music, like a conductor’s performance, portraying intervals of time and pitch; frequency and waveform; pulse and rest. In this presentation, Morton explores different states of alertness and levels of consciousness.

Zone Plans, 2022

Oil and acrylic on canvas
220 x 240 x 3.5 cm, 86 5/8 x 94 1/2 x 1 3/8 in

Eye of the Rainbow (dark), 2021

Rebar, cast jesmonite, spray paint
90 x 60 x 9 cm, Plinth 120 x 30 x 30 cm

Eva Rothschild’s predominately sculptural practice is constructed with an everincreasing variety of materials and processes. Indeed, whilst consistently referencing the conventional materiality of sculpture — encompassing ideas of form, space and scale — Rothschild’s work displays an attentiveness to a contemporary relationship between society and the individual, the physical presence of the body and its role both in the act of making and experiencing an artwork. At Frieze New York we will present Eye of the Rainbow (dark). The piece calls to mind influences of traditional modernst sculpture — in particular, repeating the trope of the open sculpture in which the viewer is prescribed with the choice of viewing the world through the work, or looking at the sculpture alone.

Eye of the Rainbow (dark), 2021

Rebar, cast jesmonite, spray paint
90 x 60 x 9 cm, Plinth 120 x 30 x 30 cm

AND THE LAND IS OURS, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
129.5 x 86.2 cm, 51 x 34 in

Marc Hundley’s practice is known for his unique way of encapsulating moments that can be considered intimate and solitary. Lyrics lifted from songs, text found in books and poetry, along with found imagery all lend themselves to Hundley’s hand-painted ‘posters’. For his latest piece Hundley references The Smiths’ ‘A Rush and a Push and the Land Is Ours’. Hundely’s recent body of work was born from the artist’s longing for affection. With clubs and venues opening back up in New York Hundley has found himself looking at images of people being tender and affectionate, which has been the impetus for these works. Hundley will also present a new bench work at Frieze New York. These bench works evoke a sense of loneliness and reflection that could be found in waiting rooms or railway stations, offering a place to sit and think as well as a setting for communal discussions. Hundley’s reminiscences and craving for connection and company have now found a new outlet in the benches are he asks us to join in his recollections as he examines the link between the public and intimate.

AND THE LAND IS OURS, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
129.5 x 86.2 cm, 51 x 34 in

Woman Crying (Comic) #27, 2020

C-Print
160.4 x 128.7 x 4.5 cm, 63 1/8 x 50 5/8 x 1 3/4 in, Edition of 5

Over the past two decades Anne Collier has developed a far-reaching body of work that considers our evolving relationships — emotional, psychological, bio- graphical, etc. - with photographic images and with the medium of photography itself. Central to Collier’s project is a consideration of the processes through which we develop highly personal relationships with photographic images, and how these narratives both relate to and negotiate photography’s own relationship with memory, melancholia and loss. Shot in the studio, using a large-format analog camera, Collier’s work is informed as much by earlier technical and commercial photography as it is by the work of the ‘Pictures’ generation of artists. In Collier’s work a tension is established be- tween the ‘objective’, almost forensic-like depiction of her subjects and the often highly emotional nature of the images that she re-presents. Throughout her work Collier emphasizes the fraught relationships between gender and image-making. Our Frieze presentation includes works from her respextive series Woman Crying (Comic) and Filter, based on imagery sourced from American romance comic books published between the 1950s and the 1980s. Exclusively marketed to an adolescent female readership, the comic books’ cliched narratives seemed designed to reinforce the notion of a subservient and eternally suffering female subject.

Woman Crying (Comic) #27, 2020

C-Print
160.4 x 128.7 x 4.5 cm, 63 1/8 x 50 5/8 x 1 3/4 in, Edition of 5

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